The Least, First

Monte Asbury's blog

Posts Tagged ‘Economic growth

A dramatic graph: income growth by income quintile

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Here’s another great find by the Freakonomics blog.

Dark bars, below, represent income growth across the economic spectrum from 1947-1973.  The least grew the most (br-r-ravo!), and the middle and upper classes did pretty well, too.

The light bars tell a more troubling story.  In recent times (73-05), the smallest incomes grew (as a percentage) the least.  In fact, without exception, the more income a quintile received, the greater was the percent of increase in that quintile’s paycheck. The least (thus), benefited least. The first, the most.

Put another way:  the economy disproportionately rewarded high-income people.  And it hasn’t always been this way.

clipped from freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com

Economic Growth Across the Income Distribution

Yes, we already know the facts — income inequality has been increasing since the 1970’s. But it can be easy to lose sight of just how important this has been. This presentation of the data — by Claudia Goldin and my former thesis advisor Larry Katz, really hits home:

INSERT DESCRIPTION
Note: The figure plots the annual percentage growth rate in mean real family income by quintile and for the top 5 percent of families for 1947 to 1973 and 1973 to 2005. Incomes are converted to constant dollars using the Consumer Price Index Research Series (CPI-U-RS). The income concept used is the official U.S. Census Bureau measure of pre-tax, post-transfer money income.
Read the full Goldin and Katz posting, over at VoxEU, for a deeper understanding of why. (Hint: It’s education.)
[T]hese data remind us that for most of the distribution there hasn’t been much income growth.

Seeing it in graphic form is startling, eh?

Follow the link to the original article to explore the thesis that this all springs from education issues.

Thought-provoking! What’s your take?

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Why cutting rich folks’ taxes doesn’t stimulate the economy

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And what does.

Another fascinating post comes from the ever-excellent True Conservative.

Consider: In 2007, only 9% of privately-held U.S. businesses … cited a “shortage of long-term finance” as a constraint on expansion. “Shortage of skilled workers” is No. 1.

So how do you increase the number of skilled workers? Here’s the story:

clipped from trueconservative.typepad.com
Here’s the central tenet of supply-side/trickle-down/voodoo Reaganomics:
If rich people get (and keep) more money, they will invest it and promote economic growth, so everyone will prosper.
That would (perhaps) be true if a shortage of investment were an important constraint on businesses […]
But availability of investment money is the least important constraint […]
[I]t ranks dead last on the list of business constraints. […]
A shortage of skilled workers in now the #1 constraint […]

Constraint 2
[This is the] economic view so ably explicated by James Livingston, which I summarize and link to here […]
The fact is that wealthy people can’t find truly productive investments offering sufficient returns, so they turn instead to investments that don’t have anything to do with production or productivity. (Think: MBSes, CDOs, CDSes, etc.)[…]
Since the greatest constraint on growth is currently a shortage of skilled workers, the best path to prosperity seems to be taxing those unproductive dollars and investing them in the thing that … is prosperity-producing: education.
Making sure that wealthy people have plenty of money is not the way to produce prosperity. That’s a self-serving myth […]
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Provocative, eh?


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Written by Monte

November 21, 2008 at 10:50 pm