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Why bombing Iran won’t work

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And a few things that just might.

Tehran
Tehran – Image via Wikipedia

“You can’t bomb knowledge,” said Robert Litwak, Director of the Division of International Security Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars […]

[B]ombing … Iran’s nuclear sites will not deter future technological developments […]

US military action … would only trigger major responses worldwide, … a worsening of the fragile state of Iraq and “a rally around the flag effect in Iran.”

Washington will need to recognize that “what is politically serious in Washington is politically insignificant in Tehran.” What the US has previously viewed as a big step toward normalization, such as allowing the importation of pistachios and carpets, has little weight in Iran […]

Pres. Obama and other political figures have not recognized the need to use sensitive language when dealing with Iran. Iran has expressed its disdain for phrases such as “carrots and sticks,” that the US has repeatedly used […] [T]his mistranslates to say that the US plans to deal with Iran as a donkey, either reward it with carrots or beat it into submission. “This will backfire on us,” … stated Robin Wright, journalist, author and public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

Clipped from niacouncil.org

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Written by Monte

March 3, 2009 at 2:31 pm

“They are bombing 1.5 million people in a cage”

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A Norwegian doctor in Gaza describes serving 2500 wounded, 50% of them women and children (naturally:  half the Palestinian population is under 15 ).  He has seen only one military casualty. Surgery goes on around the clock.
clipped from www.juancole.com

“It’s Hell in Here”
“They are Bombing 1.5 million People in a Cage”

He says he has seen one military casualty come into the hospital. Of 2500 wounded, 50% are women and children. Doing surgery around the clock. There are injuries you do not want to see– children coming in with open abdomens, with injured legs, we had to amputate both of them. This is a war on the civilian population of Gaza. It is a very young population. They cannot flee. They are fenced in. They are bombing one and a half million people in a cage.

Also please write your representative and senator, send this link, and demand that the US intervene diplomatically to stop this atrocity.
blog it
(NO SALE, NO ARCHIV...

Image by Getty Images via Daylife

FAR FROM IT: Rather than working on a plan for intervention, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer is planning a resolution of support for Israel.


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Listen to Jeremiah Wright for yourself

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This is daring, but excellent preaching, and way different from what I’d been led to expect. Way different. I so hope you’ll watch it. Here are some things that surprised me:

  • I heard he quoted Malcolm X; not so. He quotes retired U.S. Ambassador Edward Peck, a veteran diplomat, who said in a TV interview that what Malcolm X had said (“the chickens are coming home to roost”) was true of what was happening to the U.S.A.
  • I heard that he singled out the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; not so. The references to those cities were part of a long list of incidents he mentions to demonstrate a point.
  • I heard that he was anti-American, that he preached hate, that he was anti-white; not so. He’s preaching here as an American (he’s an ex-Marine, by the way). He is preaching in opposition to hatred and revenge! He calls America to carefully consider its path. I found it a tender-hearted, thought-provoking message, well worth hearing.

This is a preacher challenging the morality of a nation of violence, and he’s got a point. If all the criticisms against him are as far from his meaning as the reports on this sermon have been, he’s been sorely slandered, and we’ve been badly misled.


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Written by Monte

March 27, 2008 at 10:35 pm

American cluster bombs still blasting Laotian children

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Paul CottleCouple of weeks ago, I posted the story of Paul Cottle, who left his job when his company was taken over by ATK, maker of cluster bombs. A comment showed up this week, from a reader named Dan, like so:

Way to go Paul! It’s heartening to see such courage. If you have a second, check out the open letter to Paul from the U.S. Campaign to Ban Landmines at http://www.uscbl.org.

I followed the link, and found these remarkable paragraphs:

On April 30, 1975 Saigon fell to North Vietnamese forces, finally ending U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. …

From 1964 to 1973 the United States dropped 90 million cluster bomblets on neighboring Laos in 580,000 bombing missions—equivalent to one planeload every 8 minutes, 24 hours-a-day, for 9 years.

Up to 30% of the cluster bomblets failed to detonate, leaving as many as 25-30 million unexploded bomblets covering more than one-third of Laos at war’s end. It is estimated that there are at least 10 million cluster submunitions still littering the land. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Monte

March 6, 2008 at 9:57 pm

Posted in Politics

Zinn: 7 Conclusions about war

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Baghdad bombingI found historian Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States so important that now I read everything of his I come across. Always controversial, here are some excerpts from this WWII bombardier’s introduction to “Bomb After Bomb: a Violent Cartography,” by Elin O’Hara Slavick, as reprinted in Counterpunch.

On bombing:

I am stunned by the thought that we, the “civilized” nations, have bombed cities and countrysides and islands for a hundred years. Yet, here in the United States, which is responsible for most of that, the public, as was true of me, does not understand–I mean really understand–what bombs do to people. That failure of imagination, I believe, is critical to explaining why we still have wars, why we accept bombing as a common accompaniment to our foreign policies, without horror or disgust. …

On patriotism, a useful distinction between government and country:

Patriotism is defined as obedience to government, obscuring the difference between the government and the people. Thus, soldiers are led to believe that “we are fighting for our country” when in fact they are fighting for the governmentRead the rest of this entry »

Written by Monte

December 17, 2007 at 6:18 pm

Posted in patriotism, Politics