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Colleges accepting more rich kids, limiting middle class and poor admissions

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Prestigious schools are eager, this year, to admit students whose parents pay full price. Needier students get bumped.
clipped from www.nytimes.com

Colleges Are Accepting More Students Who Can Pay Full Fare

In the bid for a fat envelope this year, it may help, more than usual, to have a fat wallet. […]
Facing fallen endowments and needier students, many colleges are looking more favorably on wealthier applicants as they make their admissions decisions this year.

Institutions that have pledged to admit students regardless of need are finding ways to increase the number of those who pay full fare in ways that allow the colleges to maintain the claim of being need-blind — taking more students from the transfer or waiting lists, for instance, or admitting more foreign students who pay full freight.

[T]hey say the inevitable result is that needier students will be shifted down to the less expensive and less prestigious schools
“There’s going to be a cascading of talented lower-income kids down the social hierarchy of American higher education, and some cascading up of affluent kids,” […]
giving more seats to higher-paying students […]
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ClipMarks commenters (Boniface) wrote: “There’s the death of the middle class! The upper and lower will become more and more distant as time goes by.”

Could be.  The least, last.

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Power and Powerlessness (Easter sermon)

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Resurrection of the Lord: Easter Day, March 23, 2008

The Angel is Opening Christ’s Tomb, 1640Matthew 28:1-10; Acts 10:34-43; Colossians 3:1-4; Psalm 118:1-2,14-24 (Easter A)

Christ, the Lord Is Risen Today
Alleluia, Alleluia
Our God Reigns
The Wonderful Cross

Matthew 28
Risen from the Dead
After the Sabbath, as the first light of the new week dawned, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to keep vigil at the tomb. Suddenly the earth reeled and rocked under their feet as God’s angel came down from heaven, came right up to where they were standing. He rolled back the stone and then sat on it. Shafts of lightning blazed from him. His garments shimmered snow-white. The guards at the tomb were scared to death. They were so frightened, they couldn’t move.

The angel spoke to the women: “There is nothing to fear here. Read the rest of this entry »

World’s most/least corrupt nations

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Intriguing analysis of world corruption:
clipped from www.gulfnews.com

Corruption watchdog Transparency International has released a list of the world’s most and least corrupt nations […]
The report comes ahead of a conference in Bali this week where more than 100 countries are expected to gather for a United Nations anti-corruption conference […]
The lower the CPI of a country, the higher corruption is, with 0 being the most corrupt and 10 being very clean […]
Most corrupt country and CPI score: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Monte

January 27, 2008 at 9:40 pm

Posted in Politics

We believe in the resurrection. . .don’t we? Easter sermon 2007

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Mary Magdalene at the tombResurrection of the Lord (Easter Day), April 8, 2007
Luke 24:1-12; Acts 10:34-43; 1 Corinthians 15:19-26; Psalm 118:1-2,14-24
[See also I’m not about to let his grace go to waste, the Easter sermon of 2006.]

Christ the Lord is Risen Today
Alleluia, Alleluia
Forever
Because He Lives (chorus only)
He Is Lord
Prayer
Welcome
Elisabeth Tinnes sings
Luke 24:1-12 [read it from pew Bible]
Daniel Clendennin at The Journey With Jesus:

In her book Practicing Resurrection, [Nora] Gallagher recalls a conversation with [her friend] Harriet who told her about sitting in church at the National Cathedral in Washington. During the course of a boring sermon the priest asked the congregation in unctuous tones, “Now what do you really want for Christmas this year?” “I nearly rose from my pew,” she told Nora. “I was gathering myself up until I looked over at my sister who was giving me That Look, and I sat back down, but what I wanted to do was stand up and call out, ‘I would really like to believe in the resurrection.’

We believe in the resurrection. Don’t we? We want to. But faith is not faith without doubt, and sometimes I worry: Monte, do you really believe this? How come it seems so far away to you sometimes? Read the rest of this entry »

Amnesty USA volunteers help stop anti-Palestinian amendment

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Bad news to good news!

Last Friday, Sen. John Kyl (R-AZ) proposed an amendment to the budget bill prohibiting use of any of its funds for assistance to refugees who resettle in the USA—if they happen to be from Gaza.  When I heard of it, I thought, “What on earth?  Why would he …?” And then, “Ohhh, no.”

Yesterday, it became clear that the amendment was heading for a vote.  Amnesty USA emailed its network, of which I am proud to be a part.  Here’s what we learned:

clipped from blog.amnestyusa.org

A Palestinian boy pours water into a dish for a woman as she sits on the rubble of her home, March 6, 2009. (c) MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images

A Palestinian boy pours water into a dish for a woman as she sits on the rubble of her home in Jabalia in the northern Gaza Strip , March 6, 2009. (c) MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images

Palestinians: Keep out?

Middle East, Refugees, United States | Posted by: Christoph Koettl, March 9, 2009 at 2:28 PM

Should Palestinians from Gaza be treated differently under US refugee law? According to Senator Jon Kyl (R – AZ), the answer is yes.

Last Friday, Senator Kyl introduced an amendment to the Omnibus Appropriations bill, which adds the following line:

“None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act may be made available to resettle Palestinians from Gaza into the United States.” […]

Contrary to a policy of 30 years, which extends protection to refugees on the basis of need, this amendment seeks to discriminate against an entire group based on nationality alone

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Now the good stuff. Today, I (along with many others) received this email message:

Hi,

We wanted to send you a quick update on last night’s Gaza refugee vote. Thanks to your quick mobilization in which over 16,000 of you faxed letters in a span of just two hours, Senator Kyl withdrew his discriminatory amendment.

A bipartisan group of several Senators including Leahy (VT), Kerry (MA) and Gregg (NH) stood on the floor of the Senate and spoke out against the amendment. Your faxes together with our champions on this issue applied enough political pressure for Senator Kyl to just withdraw the amendment completely.

Again, this was one of those moments when together we really made the difference. Thanks again.

— Sarnata, Steve, Zahir, Edie and the rest of the team here at AIUSA

Ya – hoo!

Yes! We can make a difference!

Check out AmnestyUSA if you’d like to add your voice.  Let’s make a nation that treats its neighbors the way we’d want them to treat us, were we in their shoes.


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Written by Monte

March 10, 2009 at 10:18 pm