The Least, First

Monte Asbury's blog

Archive for April 25th, 2009

Iowa tightens up on factory-farm water polluters

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Good news from Blog for Iowa: A renewed and extended anti-pollution bill bans spreading of liquid manure on frozen and snow-covered ground over a longer part of the year than ever before.  The bill has passed the Iowa House and is expected to pass unchanged in the Senate.
clipped from www.blogforiowa.com
Victory for Clean Water!  Iowa House Passes Bill Extending Ban on Manure Application

Due to widespread pressure from members of Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement (CCI) and other environmental groups from all across the state, the Iowa House passed SF 432 with strong amendments today. This bill will ban the application of factory farm liquid manure on snow-covered ground during the winter months [extending the ban to start December 21, vs. February 1 in the original version] and bans application on frozen ground between Feb. 1 and April 1.

In the past few years, Iowa has nearly doubled the number of waterways on the impaired waterways list and … the United States Geological Survey pointed to Iowa as one of the leading contributors to the Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

The bill also requires the DNR to give progress reports to the appropriate legislative committees on the impact on Iowa’s water quality. The bill now goes to the Senate where it is expected to pass as is

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Our beautiful state has become the sewer of the midwest.  There’s a long ways to go before we Iowans can hold our heads up downstream, but this is an important and hopeful development.

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Indonesia: Radical Muslims’ parties lose support

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Bravo, Indonesia!

The world’s largest Muslim nation rejects radicals at the polls:

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Indonesia’s Voters Retreat From Radical Islam

Session of the Indonesian People's Representat...
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[H]ere in the world’s most populous Muslim nation […] Islamic parties [are] suffering a steep drop in popular support. […]

In parliamentary elections this month, voters punished Islamic parties that focused narrowly on religious issues, and even the parties’ best efforts to appeal to the country’s mainstream failed to sway the public.[…]

The party had projected that it would double its share of seats in Parliament even as it stuck to its founding goal of bringing Shariah, or Islamic law, to Indonesia, the world’s fourth most populous nation, with 240 million people. […]

Altogether, the major Islamic parties suffered a drop in support from 38 percent in 2004 to less than 26 percent this year […]

[F]undamentalist measures seem to have alienated moderate Indonesians […]

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